Tag Archives: Budgeting

Hate Budgeting? How a Percentage-Based Budget Might Work for You

Flickr/Keith Ramsey

Flickr/Keith Ramsey

I’ve heard just about every excuse in the book for not making a budget. I’ve even excused my own way out of budgeting more times than I care to admit. What I’ve learned in the process is that just like diet and exercise plans or productivity goals, budgets aren’t one-size-fits-all. In other words, the style of budgeting that helps you get your personal finances on track might be a disaster for someone else.

One very simple and easy-to-follow budgeting style is percentage-based budgeting. Is it a fit for you? Find out in my new post on WiseBread.

Advertisements

Comments Off on Hate Budgeting? How a Percentage-Based Budget Might Work for You

Filed under Writing

Build a Better Budget in 5 Minutes Flat

Flickr/401(k) 2013

Flickr/401(k) 2013

Do you have a budget?

If not, you’ve been meaning to get to it, right? According a survey conducted by Bankrate, 40% of Americans don’t keep a budget. But if you’re dreading getting the job done, maybe you shouldn’t be. Budgeting isn’t so bad, and it doesn’t have to be about spreadsheets and calculations and highlighter pens. In fact, at the most practical level, budgeting is really simple. And it only takes five minutes to get started, plus another five or so minutes for each of the follow up steps to really build your budget.

Ready? Find out how in my new post on WiseBread.

Comments Off on Build a Better Budget in 5 Minutes Flat

Filed under Writing

Consider Eloping: That Big Fat Wedding Costs Way More Than You Think

Flickr/Frabuleuse

Flickr/Frabuleuse

A lot of people – well, a lot of women anyway – dream about the big day they walk down the aisle. The flowers, the shoes, the favors, the food, the dress (!) – these are all the things we tend to fantasize about. What never breaks through that dream bubble, however, is how much it will all cost. If it did, many of us would probably skip the wedding and elope.

According to Weddingbells magazine, the average cost of a wedding in Canada is $32,358. In purely objective terms, that is a lot of money for the vast majority of people. The real sticker shock, however, is actually a whole lot higher. Your $20,000 wedding? It may really end up costing you at least three times that much. The same goes for the dress, the food, all of it.

No, we’re not kidding. Read all about it in my new post on GoldenGirlFinance.com.

Comments Off on Consider Eloping: That Big Fat Wedding Costs Way More Than You Think

Filed under Writing

If Your Bankbook Was a Business How Much Richer Would You Be?

Flickr/Dave Dugdale

Flickr/Dave Dugdale

If you’re an investor, you probably have a pretty good idea of what to look for in a company. You want strong income, good cash flow, a solid balance sheet, and as little debt as possible. Those are things that not only help to create a profit, but maintain one.

Here’s a funny fact, though: Many investors fail to apply the same kind of critical eye to their own bank balances. In fact, according to the CFP Board in the U.S., Certified Financial Planners have been filing for bankruptcy in increasing numbers over the past few years. Of course, that’s true of much of the population, but we kind of expect financial pros to know better, right?

In fact, if we applied the same standards we apply to the businesses we invest in to our own bankbooks, we would all be a lot richer for it.  Find out why in my new post on GoldenGirlFinance.com.

Comments Off on If Your Bankbook Was a Business How Much Richer Would You Be?

Filed under Writing

Why You Pay More at the Grocery Store (and How to Save)

Flickr/malloreigh

Flickr/malloreigh

Many of us don’t think too much about what we throw into our grocery carts — or how much it all costs. After all, we have to eat! But for most Americans, food makes up one of the largest expenses in the budget, right after paying for housing and transportation. If you can trim just $20 off your monthly grocery bill, it can save you $1,000 per year; saving $60 per week could put more than $3,000 extra in your pocket.

Believe it or not, those kinds of savings aren’t unrealistic, and you don’t have to starve to death to achieve them. All you have to do is look at where grocery stores make their money and where you may have some bad shopping habits. Learn more in my article on WiseBread.com.

Comments Off on Why You Pay More at the Grocery Store (and How to Save)

Filed under Writing

How to Save Money by Going (Mostly) Meatless

Flickr/Elle_Ann

Flickr/Elle_Ann

Let me start by saying this — I like a big, fat steak as much the next omnivore. I like roasted chickens and sausages. And I really like bacon.

My wallet doesn’t love it quite so much, however.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, meat makes up about 21% of the average American grocery budget, making it the most expensive category after processed foods. That suggests that many of us eat quite a lot of meat, and that it has a pretty significant effect on our bottom line.

Of course, most of us also know that adding more plants to our meals is good for our health. A study published in the Medical Journal of Australia in June found that those who followed a vegetarian diet were less likely to have heart disease, diabetes, and colorectal cancer. They were also less likely to be obese. In other words, money isn’t the only reason to consider cutting a down your meat consumption. How can adding a few vegetarian staples to your week cut your grocery bill? Find out in my new post on WiseBread.com.

Comments Off on How to Save Money by Going (Mostly) Meatless

Filed under Writing

7 Sure-Fire Money-Saving Banking Moves

Flickr/Truthout.org

Flickr/Truthout.org

Getting a bank account is often our first introduction to the world of money, and it often happens at such a young age that we take that part of our financial lives for granted. Our paychecks are deposited to our accounts, we withdraw money to pay for the things we need, and we assume that’s all there is to it. The reality is that the options and variety available in the world of checking and savings accounts means that leaving everything up to chance can get very expensive. Fortunately, it doesn’t take much work to implement key money-saving banking moves and keep a little more of your hard-earned money to yourself. Get some tips in my new article on Dividend.com: http://www.dividend.com/my-money/7-sure-fire-money-saving-banking-moves/

Comments Off on 7 Sure-Fire Money-Saving Banking Moves

Filed under Writing