10 No-Stress Ways to Do More in Less Time

Flickr/Luke

Flickr/Luke

Sometimes I work too much. There, I said it. It shames me a bit, to be honest. But what really bothers me about that scenario, when it happens, is that I don’t accomplish wonderful and amazing things. At all. Instead, I get really tired, and really grouchy, and I work more and more slowly and ineffectually so that I end up having to work even more. (See also: 6 Rules of a Productive Workspace)

It’s stupid, but we all do it. What I always seem to forget is that the point of working hard isn’t to work more but to get more done. And, if I can do that in less time, I can bugger off and spend the rest of the day doing something significantly more awesome. What that all boils down to is being more productive with the time I have. How? I dug up some research on how to schedule your day for optimal productivity. Check it out in my new post on WiseBread.

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5 Beginning Investor Mistakes I’ve Made (And You Don’t Have To)

There’s something I’ve noticed about a lot of people who write about investing: They’re either very rich or they work as investment professionals. Now, I don’t think that that makes them unqualified to give advice to those of us who don’t have a seven (or eight!) figure net worth, but it does make it a little hard to identify with them. After all, if I had a million bucks in the bank, putting some of it in riskier investments would be a lot easier to stomach. Ditto for investing other people’s money.

But here’s the thing. I’m an investor, too. I’m not a professional one or a rich one. But I am richer than before I started. And I’m a smarter investor than I was when I started, too. I’m also getting more confident about investing money in the stock market. That said, I made a lot of rookie mistakes along the way. Here are five of the ones that stand out. Read about them in my new post on WiseBread. And try to avoid them, OK?

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The 10 Kinds of People Who Get Rich (and How They Do It)

Flickr/Spyros Papaspyropoulos

Flickr/Spyros Papaspyropoulos

I think it’s safe to say that most people wouldn’t mind having a little more money in the bank. Maybe a lot more money. According to a 2008 survey by Pew Research Group, 43% of Americans report that being wealthy is “somewhat important” to them, while another 13% said that being rich was “very important.” Of course, wanting to be richer is one thing; actually accumulating that wealth is quite another. However, there’s plenty of research to support the idea that there are certain sorts of people who are likely to become wealthy — and I’m not just talking about the kind who were born that way. In fact, according to research by Fidelity, 86% of today’s millionaires are self-made. Check out 10 traits that tend to show up in the wealthiest people, and how those characteristics help them bring in the big bucks in my new post on WiseBread.

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Why We’re So Materialistic – Even Though We Know It’s Dumb

Flickr/Leo Reynolds

Flickr/Leo Reynolds

I recently came across a photographic essay that showed the bedrooms of dozens of children around the world. It’s beautiful and interesting, but what stands out the most is how much stuffsome of these kids have — closets bursting with toys and other possessions, while others have so little — a straw mat, a cup, a threadbare shirt.

Of course, my instinct is to feel sorry for the little girl with only one doll, or the little boy who sleeps on a wooden pallet and proudly displays a few tattered books. Then again, that might just be materialism talking. After all, the photographs reveal nothing else about these children; whether they get enough food to eat, a safe, warm place to live, and parents who take good care of them. It’s just so easy to assume that they are disadvantaged because they don’t have a television and a mountain of toys.

The truth is that most us (myself included) have way more than what’s required to meet our basic needs, more than is required to make our lives more convenient and comfortable, and even more than what we need to keep us happy. Check out a few reasons why in my new post on WiseBread.

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The 10 Commandments of Credit Card Use

Flickr/401(k) 2013

Flickr/401(k) 2013

Some people will argue that credit cards are an irredeemable financial evil. They certainly do lead a lot of people down the path of overspending, debt, and even bankruptcy. But I don’t think the problem is the credit cards themselves — it’s how we use them. And if you follow a few key rules, you can enjoy their convenience and their benefits without the financial fallout. You can start by faithfully following 10 credit card commandments. Check them out in my new post on WiseBread.

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10 Fat-Filled Foods You Should Stop Avoiding

Flickr/French Tart

Flickr/French Tart

There’s something going down in the yogurt aisle at the grocery store, and I don’t like it one bit. First it was low-fat yogurt. Then nonfat. Then fat free. Now, labels are trumpeting “0% fat!” and “only 35 calories per serving!”. Next up: an empty carton?

I find it a little sad, actually. “Calorie” has become such a bad word that we’ve forgotten that we actually need calories to live. The same goes for fat.

Yes, you heard me. You need to eat fat. At least some fat. Probably more than you think. In fact, evidence is mounting that a diet with relatively high levels of the right fat is healthier than the typical alternative — one with more sugar and starch. Even the highly-publicized Mediterranean diet is 30% fat.

Want to add more fat to your diet? Check out 10 fat-filled foods you should be eating in my new post on WiseBread.

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4 Financial Lessons From “Fifty Shades of Grey”

ellebnere

ellebnere

I have a confession: I read “Fifty Shades of Grey.” All of it. And before you judge me, you should know that even if you haven’t read it, chances are many of your neighbors, co-workers, and family members have. For all the terrible reviews it got, the series (yes, there are three books) sold 70 million copies worldwide. Statistics don’t lie, people.

At any rate, I read this book not for the fantasy, not to get to know the ins and outs of what everyone else was talking about (and there were a lot of ins and outs in this book). No, I read it strictly in search of financial lessons. I’m really that professional. It’s just the way I roll.

Or at least that’s my story, and I’m sticking to it.

So, without further ado, check out four financial lessons you can learn from “Fifty Shades” in my new post on WiseBread. Because that’s what you were reading it for too… right?

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